Sexuality: Andropause and DHEA

Andropause and DHEA are a medical condition and a cure paving the way for a steady recovery. A lack of DHEA, known as Dehydroepianodrosterone in medical circles, is directly correlated with impotence in men.
This is also referred to as erectile dysfunction. Quite simply, the more DHEA there is in your body – the better off you are. It acts as a replenisher – pumping life into various processes such as lowering cholesterol levels, reducing fat, and regulating healthy blood pressure. DHEA is synonymous with versatility – it simply branches out throughout your body serving as a cleaner and a regulator.
The effects of Andropause can be effectively reduced by using DHEA as a hormonal supplement. Produced in the adrenal glands, Dehydroepianodrosterone is responsible for producing chemicals that influence the growth of testosterone in the body. Used as a dietary supplement, DHEA can do wonders for you. The enhancement of memory, stamina build up, and increased levels of libido can restore a man back to his natural state. It is a great treatment for men with erectile dysfunction, a common symptom of Andropause as well.
There have been plenty of tests using DHEA and placebos where libido and erectile function improved significantly in the men using this hormone than those that didn’t. It has been said that low levels of DHEA is linked with a speeded up aging process. Before research efforts were placed into discovering more about this hormone, it was associated with helping in weight loss. Tests done on mice in laboratories showed that DHEA controlled their levels of obesity. Soon after, it was associated with a slew of other health benefits.
Bodybuilding enthusiasts should look closely into making DHEA part of their nutritional supplement regimen. The hormone plays a part in helping grow muscle mass (similar to the same rate as other over the counter products such as creatine and whey protein), reversing osteoporosis by building stronger bones and strengthening bone tissue, and regulating sex hormones in both men and women (estrogen and testosterone.) It works along the same plane as human growth hormone, another anti-aging drug given to Andropause sufferers in particular.
As stated previously, hormones are not synthetic. There are human derived hormones that are packaged in capsules and pills and sold to the general public to increase the amount of hormone already present in the body. The production of DHEA in the adrenal glands is highest during the childhood and teenage years, trailing off later on during mid-life. Men produce more of this hormone than women, and senior citizens around the age of 65 have the lowest levels of all.
Consuming harmful substances can derail the production of DHEA, such as drinking Sprite, Coca-Cola, or other caffeine-packed beverages. Drink a bottle of mineral water and hold off on the Fanta next time! Other things that influence the levels of DHEA in the body are lack of exercise and stress. Basically, any activity that promotes aging will result in drop off levels. Jump on that treadmill, release that excess stress, and maintain your already decreasing amounts of this vital hormone!
Combat Andropause by using DHEA as a hormonal supplement. If you take too much, your body will stop producing its own natural amount. An excess of DHEA can skyrocket your levels of testosterone, amplifying your male features. Not a good idea for women who want to maintain their female attributes. It is always wise to take proper safety precautions when consuming any hormone supplement or drug. Remember, recent studies have shown that too much Vitamin E can cause heart failure. Did you think vitamins were care-free and harmless? Think again!


Lucky women. They’ve always known that sometime in their mid-40s they will begin to experience changes in hormone levels that will lead to uncomfortable symptoms and culminate in the change of life: menopause. It may seem odd to consider the certainty of menopause a lucky thing, but being able to openly talk about a medically documented event is liberating. Women can commiserate with each other and consult with their doctors for help dealing with uncomfortable symptoms. Men, however, have not had the luxury of receiving help for their mid-life discomforts. In fact, andropause, or male menopause, is not even widely accepted as a legitimate medical phenomenon.
There are several reasons the idea of Male Menopause has been received with skepticism. First, it’s a much more gradual event than a woman’s menopause. While a woman will experience a measurable and obvious drop in her estrogen levels beginning in her forties, a man’s testosterone levels begin to drop very gradually as early as thirty years old. Since the shift in hormones occurs so differently in men, the accompanying symptoms are also more gradual. For example, a woman may suddenly find herself irritable or depressed, and recognize that a change has taken place. But a man’s onset of symptoms takes much longer, so he may not recognize that he is changing.
Second, Andropause is not as final as women’s Menopause. When a woman’s estrogen levels decline sufficiently, her menstrual cycle will cease. She will be unable to bear children. Her ovaries will not produce eggs, and her uterus will not be able to sustain a pregnancy. She truly experiences a change of life: she has changed from a fertile human to one unable to procreate. This doesn’t happen with a man. Men continue to produce enough testosterone into their 80s to be able to father children. Even if a man cannot have intercourse and ejaculate to impregnate his partner, semen with sperm in it can still be collected and used to fertilize an egg. Perhaps the biggest reason that scientists have discussed andropause with skepticism is that men do not experience the change of life to the extent that women do.
Three, men are expected to be stoic about symptoms. Women have support groups, literature, and medical experts lining up to assist with the change of life. Decades-long, nationwide studies are done about the benefits and risks of hormone replacement therapy to treat menopause. Women talk about, joke about, and complain about their symptoms and discomforts. Men, meanwhile, endure their discomforts in silence. It’s not manly to whine about problems such as weight gain, thinning hair, difficulty achieving or maintaining erections, sleeplessness, or depression. And what man would ever want to discuss his loss of libido? Women talk, men cope silently. The sad thing is, coping is often easier when professional intervention can be openly sought.
Acknowledging the truth of male menopause is definitely the first step in helping men cope with the changes taking place in their bodies.